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Where we are now, relies on where we have been and where we are going. The past and the future inform us of the present; distant pasts and far off futures, dystopia and utopia intermingle. This is the Science Fiction genre I use.

An early example of Science Fiction, Mary Shelley’s Frankenstein, is a love story full of moral warnings, which are as relevant now as ever they were.

Additionally, The Grimm Brothers give us children’s tales from the ancient forests of Europe, warning us not to stray from the path and to beware of those that lurk alone in the shadows.


Frankenstein II  Oil on linen  90 x 110 cm 2019

Frankenstein II Oil on linen 90 x 110 cm 2019 (Photo: Julie Becquart)


“…and I withdrew from the window, unable to bear these
emotions.” It is not sre if Mary Wollstonecraft Shelley wants the
DeLacy family to be seen as an ideal or already as the failure of
the family concept, but in using the first person narrator she gives
voice to the creature, who is speaking the above words. Stepping
deep in Shelley’s Gothic novel of 1818, Guy Allott is using the hole
in the wall, the cottage window, the lovely chalet façade, as a
screen for lifting off his own narrative of the Frankenstein story. In
an act of bad painting, the creature is identified as a creator and in
doing so, the artist fuses the different levels and perspectives of
narrator, figure, artisit, phantasy (sic) and desire, into one big game.

About Lies, Gussglashalle, Berlin. May 2019.


Frankenstein I  oil on linen  20 x 35 cm 2018

Frankenstein I oil on linen 20 x 35 cm 2018 (Photo: Julie Becquart)

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